Where To Go: Big Island of Hawai’i

HawaII Green Beach

Green Beach on the Big Island of Hawai’i photo by Tedd

It’s time once again for #WhereToGoWednesday. The Big Island was the most desired destination this week, and it’s easy to see why.  It has something for everyone – from the local flavor of lush, green Hilo to the craggy lava beds of Volcanoes National Park; from the resorts and golden sands of Kona to the sometimes snowy summit of Mauna Kea and it’s observatories.  All good reasons, but this howlie would go just for the ahi tuna poke alone.

WhereToGo: Bazaruto Island

bazaruto island lodge

photo by F H Mira

Though it’s not surprising to see tropical beach destinations rise in popularity during the winter, it’s notable that Bazaruto Island in Mozambique is this week’s most popular destination for #WhereToGoWednesday.  When we set out to create TripTuner, we wanted to help travelers find places in tune with their interests – both near and far, familiar and unknown.  To have such a remote destination top the charts this week tells us that we’re succeeding in shedding light on lesser-known locales.

Bazaruto (part of the eponymous archipelago) is a remote gem of sweeping golden-white sand dunes, surrounded by deep indigo waters of the Indian Ocean, just a boat ride away from the popular coastal town of Vilankulo.  South African travelers have known about this part of the world for awhile, but Bazaruto Island remains largely unspoiled, with just a handful of luxe places to stay like Indigo Bay Island Resort & Spa and the Bazaruto Lodge.  Inspired to see more options?  Check out these remote beach ideas.  Stay tuned.

Where to Go: Harbour Island

Harbour Island

This week, Harbour Island is our most popular destination, and since I have a very special personal connection to this place it’s hard to rave about it without exposing a bias. So I’ll just let the description on our overview page say it all for now, and perhaps every now and then I’ll update this post with a few choice tips and pleasant memories (of course I’d love to hear yours in the comments).  Stay tuned!

WhereToGo: Torres del Paine

Grey Glacier - Torres del Paine National Park, Chile

Grey Glacier – Torres del Paine National Park, Chile – photo by wallygrom

Happy New Year! We’re kicking off 2012 with a new weekly post #WhereToGoWednesday featuring the most popular destination of the week on TripTuner. This week it’s the natural gem of a national park Torres del Paine in Chilean Patagonia. There’s nothing quite like taking in the sunset over Grey Glacier, a surreal multi-colored spectacle that lulls you to sleep after a long day of hiking…that is until you hear the crashing of the glacier shedding a few pounds at night.

hawaii big island- muana kea snowy summit- flckr-Randy Stewart

Image by Randy Stewart

Speaking of sleep, you can pitch a tent lakeside, hole up in a refugio (cabin) or splurge at the Explora Lodge a.k.a. Hotel Salto Chico. Want an informed take on how to arrange a trip there? Just ask – we’ve been and can help you sort it out quickly. In the meantime, stay tuned!

Just Back from London

Tower Bridge, London

Tower Bridge at night, viewed from a Thames River boat.

Just back from London and the World Travel Market with our Editor at Large (and New York Times Bestselling Author) Franz Wisner. Had an enjoyable and productive week introducing TripTuner to a select group of old colleagues and prospective partners alike. Year in and out, this event often delivers as much benefit from the chance encounters as with scheduled meetings. Only time will tell, but it seems we made a good impression, receiving many compliments on creating an exciting, engaging new way to help travelers find places in tune with their tastes. While there wasn’t much time for exploring, we did manage to take in a few sights en route to evening events and dinners: going through the Thames river locks; floating beneath a spectacularly lit Tower Bridge; strolling past an illuminated Big Ben and Parliament before viewing the city from the top of Millbank Tower. We checked out the freshly renovated Four Seasons Park Lane as well as the new Aloft hotel–thumbs up on both. After a pleasant dinner at Kentner’s in Soho (tasty French-brasserie fare and Champagne bar in a hip but accessible townhouse atmosphere) we had a chilled vodka martini nightcap at Duke’s Bar— the place where local lore says Ian Fleming conjured 007’s famous “shaken, not stirred” preference. All in all a successful quick trip, and we didn’t really notice the fact that we hadn’t seen the sun for 4 days. But hey, that’s London!

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Asia Travel Advice On-the-Go: A Tale of Two Travelers

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Fab Bali photo courtesy of Jason Cooper. Suksma!

Two acquaintances of mine were on the road recently, doing their own separate solo tours of Asia.  One is a female post-graduate student in her mid-20s (we’ll call her Julie) on what Australians might call a “walkabout”, an extended trip of a few months.  The other (let’s call him Brian) is an urban professional in his mid-40s, taking a three-week break between jobs.  Because I’ve traveled extensively in the region, they asked me for help in planning their respective trips.

While both of them shared the same wanderlust, it is interesting to see their divergent approaches on getting travel advice.  Both had the same big-picture questions (is X period of time enough to see certain countries, what’s the best way to get around, etc.)  But when it came to more specific suggestions about hotels or activities, Julie was just fine scouring the web for free info.  I’d offered my help, but she didn’t really see the need.  Maybe it’s just a sign of her generation: “millennials” are well-known for their comfort with technology.  But I’ve even heard older travelers boast of how easily they can dig up good travel info.  Indeed it’s almost a source of pride.

So what’s the big deal? I too enjoy uncovering valuable nuggets of travel info – whether it’s a more direct flight, the perfect hotel or a unique activity. Some websites will even give you a “medal” if you play along and contribute your own info.  Which in turn makes such sites more attractive to search engines, creating even more opportunities to sort through an ever-increasing amount of info.

But over the years I’ve found that it can eat up a ton of time.  And when I do search, my signal-to-noise ratio is much tighter – I’d like less searching and more finding.  Call me old and crotchety but my brain gets enough info searching and processing every day at work.  It’s like getting your driver’s license.  All you want to do is drive, then years later all you do IS drive.  The novelty wears off.  Same thing with technology.  The excitement of getting 4 million search results in 0.7 seconds wears off after clicking on the 4th or 5th result.  (Like many, I’m still waiting for technology to deliver my increased leisure time).

Perhaps Julie is simply a better multi-tasker, whose younger brain can withstand more info processing like a newer-model computer.  But as a recent Stanford University study shows, over-tasking the brain affects even the hardiest multi-tasking college students.  Try keeping it up in an office environment for 20 years, and you begin to understand why people like Brian want to cut to the chase and get solid, timely advice.  Without a ton of searching.

So when he asked me to help finalize an itinerary for his Asia trip, I tried not to bog him down with a ton of options.  I promised to help him out on the go as needed, but emphasized that above all he needed to GO.  Get out there on the road and enjoy these precious travel moments as much as possible.  Of course his tight time frame can explain why he chose to rely upon my on-the-go help rather than do it on his own.  And what an ironic twist that having a “virtual trip assistant” of sorts inspired Brian to hop on a flight and delight in spontaneity – something usually reserved for college students.

How did this all turn out? Brian had a great time and became a loyal early advocate of TripTuner.  As for Julie, she finally got her fill of DIY travel planning and sought me out for her last stop in Singapore.

We each have preferred ways of getting travel advice.  I just think that there’s got to be a better way of accessing all of this valuable info in a meaningful way, while providing the personal service to help fill in the gaps.  It’s one reason why we’re building TripTuner.